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Thread: Pristine Heights at 77 Mergui Road

  1. #21
    The Straits Times Guest

    Default Check Into A HOSPITEL


    Check into a HOSPITEL
    Hospital-cum-hotel complex coming up in Farrer Park by 2010

    Jessica Jaganathan
    The Straits Times
    Wednesday, 2 April 2008

    A group of local doctors are building what they hope will be Singapore's first 'mediplex' - hospital, hotel and specialist medical centre rolled into one - above the Farrer Park MRT station.
    With a focus on heart disease, cancer and general surgery, it will look to both medical tourists and the local market to fill its beds, said Dr Djeng Shih Kien, chairman of Singapore HealthPartners, the company behind the project.

    Its twin 20-storey buildings will house 217 hospital beds, 210 medical suites and a four-star hotel with about 230 rooms - 40 per cent of which can be converted into hospital beds later if needed.

    Another board member of the company, prominent local cardiologist Maurice Choo, said that the hotel-hospital combination will allow a heart-bypass patient to save up to 40 per cent of the costs by starting and ending the stay at the hotel, instead of spending all the time in the wards.

    Two floors will also be taken up by a training centre for doctors, in a tie-up with the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School.

    The company is also setting aside space in the hotel for a convention centre to host medical conferences and exhibitions.

    The Farrer Park hospital and another being built by the Parkway group in the Novena area are the private sector's response to a government plan to treat one million foreign patients here a year by 2012.

    Health economist Phua Kai Hong from the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy said the new hospitals will help meet external demand from medical tourists and a possible spillover from public hospitals once means testing is in place.

    Singapore HealthPartners - a partnership of local doctors, an architect and two foreign players - secured the 1.36ha Farrer Park site in October last year for $265 million.

    It will spend another $400 million to build and equip the mediplex, which it hopes to open on Oct 10, 2010.

    The foreign partners are Berjaya Leisure (Cayman), a subsidiary of Malaysia's Berjaya Group which has interests in gaming, stockbroking, properties, hotels and other businesses, and little-known Indonesian company Wharton Scott.

    Together, they operate under the name Singapore HealthPartners, with local dentist Dr Djeng as chairman.

    Dr Djeng, who set up the company last year, said the idea for a hospital was hatched three years ago and he had been on the lookout since for an appropriate site.

    Word spread and soon a group of 40 local doctors, including heart and cancer specialists, surgeons and eye doctors in public and private practice, joined him.

    'We felt that we should be masters of our own destiny,' said Dr Djeng.

  2. #22
    mr funny. Guest

    Default

    http://www.businesstimes.com.sg/sub/...80801,00.html?

    May 26, 2008, 5.51 pm (Singapore time)

    KSH in JV to develop Mergui Rd site


    Property-linked KSH Holdings Limited on Monday said it has entered a joint venture with Multi Wealth Singapore Pte Limited and LBH Pte Ltd to develop a freehold site at Mergui Road.

    The 74,355 sq ft site with a plot ratio of 2.8 was bought by Mergui Develpment Pte Ltd -- a unit of KSH -- last November for $120 million.

    Under the agreement, KSH will own 35 per cent stake in the JV, Multi Wealth 53 per cent and LBH 12 per cent.

    Multi Wealth is a unit of Malaysian-listed IOI Properties Bhd. -- BT newsroom

  3. #23
    mr funny. Guest

    Default

    June 4, 2008

    The incredible shrinking condo

    Compact city studios under 500 sq ft an emerging trend

    By Fiona Chan, Property Reporter


    A TINY studio under construction near Farrer Park may well be the smallest private apartment to be built in Singapore.

    It squeezes a bay window, a teeny kitchenette, a bathroom and space for a bed into just 312 sq ft - about half the size of a squash court.

    The unit - part of the new Kent Residences in Kent Road - is the most extreme example of an emerging trend in private housing: compact, capsule condos within the city.

    Targeted at young singles and property investors, some new studios have shrunk in size to as little as 300 to 400 sq ft, as developers try to make their homes more affordable amid rising costs.

    At least 20 new projects launched within the past year have had units smaller than 500 sq ft, which was almost unheard of before last year.

    Half of these projects went even further, cutting their smallest units to under 400 sq ft, making them on a par with those in famously space-squeezed cities such as New York and Hong Kong.

    Shoebox-sized studios are not entirely new here. A few older condos like Mountbatten Lodge have units less than 400 sq ft in size.

    What's new is the recent proliferation of such projects, especially in Farrer Park, Balestier and Dhoby Ghaut. Most are built by boutique developers and have under 100 units.

    Thanks to the property boom last year, home prices in these areas start at just below $1,000 per sq ft (psf) and go up to $1,600 psf. For a 400 sq ft condo, this translates to well below $700,000.

    'Construction costs are going up and space is becoming very expensive, so developers have to offer something that is affordable for the majority of home-buyers,' said Ms Peggy Ngiam, project director of Huttons Real Estate Group.

    Her firm has marketed several projects with unusually small units, including Thomson V Two in Upper Thomson Road, where half the 74 units were under 500 sq ft, with the smallest just 355 sq ft.

    With a typical unit priced at a mere $377,000, the project sold out within a day.

    In fact, most of these boutique projects are fully sold, and the most recent launches have seen good take-up rates.

    Ms Ngiam said buyers are a mix of locals and foreigners. Some are single professionals while others are investors looking for good rental yields.

    At Citigate in Rangoon Road, which was launched on Monday, 22 of its 32 units were sold within a day. The smallest unit, a 441 sq ft studio, is expected to fetch rentals of $3,000 to $3,500 a month, she said.

    Small units also reflect growing demand from singles who want to live in the city on a tight budget, said DTZ Debenham Tie Leung senior research director Chua Chor Hoon. She said developers focused on building large apartments last year and may now see a shortage of small ones.

    But other experts warned that buyers may not realise how small these units really are.

    'In the last market run-up in 1996, when prices got higher and higher, the units got smaller and smaller,' said Mr Colin Tan, head of research and consultancy at Colliers International. Even then, those units were rarely under 500 sq ft, and came without today's bay windows and air-con ledges, which eat into liveable space, he added.

    While most projects offer showflats, the smallest units are often sold on the basis of their floor plans. At Kent Residences, which has just 13 units, buyers were shown only a model of the project and its floor plans.

    'In most cases, when people see the finished flat they have bought off the plan, they say it's smaller than they expected. Can you imagine what that would be like for a 300 sq ft unit?' said Mr Tan.

    [email protected]


    A 300 sq ft apartment is roughly the size of...

    # Two of the Old Chang Kee kiosks in front of Ngee Ann City

    # Seven ping-pong tables

    # Ten standard-size office workstations

    # Half an average three-room flat, and about a quarter of an average five-room flat

    # Half the size of a squash court

  4. #24
    Unreg¡stered Guest

    Default RE: Cheung Kong Holdings Keen On Singapore

    Quote Originally Posted by mr funny
    http://www.todayonline.com/articles/261453.asp

    Wednesday, June 25, 2008

    Cheung Kong Holdings keen on Singapore


    MR LI Ka Shing’s Cheung Kong Holdings, Asia’s second-largest developer by market value, said it is keen to invest in Hong Kong, China and Singapore as the region’s property market is undergoes a “small consolidation”.

    Prime offices and industrial parks offer investment opportunities because of economic “fundamentals” in the region, Cheung Kong’s Executive Director Justin Chiu said at a property conference in Singapore yesterday. He said he doesn’t expect “significant” price declines in the next 18 months.

    Added Mr Chiu: “We’re just at the low tide of the economic cycle. When we clear the sub-prime issues, :I’m fairly confident Asia will come back.”

    Property developers are seeking more investments to meet rising demand in China and India, the two fastest-growing major economies in the world. China’s economy is forecast by the World Bank to expand by 9.8 per cent this year, even though gains in home prices slowed.

    “Across all three markets in the world — America, Europe and Asia — the best prospects, in my view, are for Asia right now,” said Mr Sameer Nayar, head of real estate finance at Credit Suisse. “It is just because you are talking about half the world’s population and most of the world’s :growth in gross domestic product is coming from Asia.”

    Mr Chiu said that residential developments may be riskier because they are more dependent on the domestic economy. Home prices in Singapore are easing after rising to record highs last year as a global credit squeeze damped demand, while Hong Kong’s home sales fell for a second month as prices cooled.

    Sales by value of residential units in Hong Kong slumped 31.1 per cent in May from a year earlier to HK$26.3 billion($4.6 billion), the biggest drop in 19 months, after falling 30.1 per cent in April.

    China’s home prices rose 9.2 per cent in May, the slowest gain since September 2007. New home prices increased 10.2 per cent last month from a year earlier. — Bloomberg
    Can trust Mr Li or not?

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    208

    Default

    This project looks good...

  6. #26
    mr ƒunny Guest

    Default 'Mickey Mouse homes' snapped up near Little India

    June 29, 2008

    property

    'Mickey Mouse homes' snapped up near Little India

    Buyers like these small apartments as they are close to the city and they seem more affordable


    By Joyce Teo, Property Correspondent


    The area near Farrer Park MRT station in Little India - once largely shunned by developers - has become the playground of smaller property players.

    These little-known companies have bought land there and launched projects that range in size from as few as 13 units to around 50.

    Recently, Suites 123 in Rangoon Road - which has 37 apartments - was largely sold out, despite weak market sentiment.

    Before that, other small projects such as Citigate Residence, [email protected] and [email protected] were also sold out. Some of these projects were sold at around $1,000 to $1,100 per sq ft (psf), which is not cheap, market watchers noted.

    However, as the apartments are usually quite small, these 'Mickey Mouse units' appear to be priced at relatively low levels. Most of these projects have shop units as well.

    Mr David Neubronner, the executive director of Savills Residential, noted that many of the one-bedroom units are just 400 sq ft and the two-bedroom units 700 sq ft.

    He added: 'A two-roomer may cost $700,000.'

    That, he said, is a 'very attractive entry point' for buyers looking to stay near the city.

    At [email protected], the 20 apartments range in size from just 366 sq ft for a one-bedroom unit to 1,044 sq ft for a two-bedroom penthouse.

    The sizes shrink even further at the 13-unit Kent Residences on Kent Road. The smallest apartment is just 312 sq ft - roughly half the size of an average three-room HDB flat, or about the size of two Old Chang Kee kiosks.

    The developer of Kent Residences, which is also behind Tyrwhitt 139 on Tyrwhitt Road, said the area is attractive because it is near an MRT station.

    These projects target singles and small families. The buyers are mainly Singaporeans in their 30s but there are also some foreigners.

    Mr Neubronner said the projects attract many end-users as the area is at the city fringe, which is getting more exciting.

    Market watchers said Farrer Park's proximity to Little India might deter single females or families with kids, but not necessarily single men.

    Still, there are many projects located north of Farrer Park MRT station, across the road from the buzz and chaos of Little India - and less savoury activities at Desker Road.

    While many people also do not want to live near the Little India conservation area, some love living there, including artists and film-makers.

    The area is full of history and character. Race Course Road, for instance, took its name from Singapore's first race course, built in Farrer Park in 1842. One of the country's oldest Buddhist temples, Leong San Buddhist Temple, is also in the vicinity.

    And when some of the newer developments are completed, the residents might include a famous face or two. At least one local celebrity is believed to have bought a unit in a small development north of Farrer Park MRT station.

    For buyers, the good thing about these small projects is that they are mostly either freehold or 999-year leasehold. With the MRT station only a short walk away, residents are basically two MRT stops away from town.

    However, market watchers warn that buyers - those who bought off developer's plans - might not realise how small the units are until they see the completed apartments.

    Nowadays, the space allocated for bay windows, planter boxes, air-con ledges and balconies can eat significantly into your living area.

    'In some instances, they can make up as much as 20 per cent or more of the total. If you want more 'liveable' space, you should do a like-for-like comparision before you make your decision,' said Chesterton International's head of research and consultancy, Mr Colin Tan.

    For instance, at the 56-unit Citigate Residence on Rangoon Road, the 441 sq ft and 517 sq ft advertised for its smaller units include the bay window, air-con ledge, planter and balcony.

    Nevertheless, many buyers could still bite simply because of the seemingly low absolute prices and projected high rental yields, market watchers say.

    'Consumers must be more prudent. The absolute value of such developments might be low, but investors have to consider whether they can find a buyer or tenant later,' said HSR Property Group's executive director, Mr Eric Cheng. 'They are suitable only for those who are comfortable with small units.'

    He said that many buyers might not realise the units are too small to live in until the projects are completed.

    'One of my friends who bought a 580 sq ft unit on Mackenzie Road told me it's like a bird's nest,' he added.

    [email protected]

  7. #27
    dakoda sucks. Guest

    Default

    For Dakoda new launch, 100% many units will be thrown back to developer mark my words... After they realised that they bought shit in the midst of low class hdb area with geylang the nearest entertainment spot.

    Quote Originally Posted by mr ƒunny
    June 29, 2008

    property

    'Mickey Mouse homes' snapped up near Little India

    Buyers like these small apartments as they are close to the city and they seem more affordable


    By Joyce Teo, Property Correspondent


    The area near Farrer Park MRT station in Little India - once largely shunned by developers - has become the playground of smaller property players.

    These little-known companies have bought land there and launched projects that range in size from as few as 13 units to around 50.

    Recently, Suites 123 in Rangoon Road - which has 37 apartments - was largely sold out, despite weak market sentiment.

    Before that, other small projects such as Citigate Residence, [email protected] and [email protected] were also sold out. Some of these projects were sold at around $1,000 to $1,100 per sq ft (psf), which is not cheap, market watchers noted.

    However, as the apartments are usually quite small, these 'Mickey Mouse units' appear to be priced at relatively low levels. Most of these projects have shop units as well.

    Mr David Neubronner, the executive director of Savills Residential, noted that many of the one-bedroom units are just 400 sq ft and the two-bedroom units 700 sq ft.

    He added: 'A two-roomer may cost $700,000.'

    That, he said, is a 'very attractive entry point' for buyers looking to stay near the city.

    At [email protected], the 20 apartments range in size from just 366 sq ft for a one-bedroom unit to 1,044 sq ft for a two-bedroom penthouse.

    The sizes shrink even further at the 13-unit Kent Residences on Kent Road. The smallest apartment is just 312 sq ft - roughly half the size of an average three-room HDB flat, or about the size of two Old Chang Kee kiosks.

    The developer of Kent Residences, which is also behind Tyrwhitt 139 on Tyrwhitt Road, said the area is attractive because it is near an MRT station.

    These projects target singles and small families. The buyers are mainly Singaporeans in their 30s but there are also some foreigners.

    Mr Neubronner said the projects attract many end-users as the area is at the city fringe, which is getting more exciting.

    Market watchers said Farrer Park's proximity to Little India might deter single females or families with kids, but not necessarily single men.

    Still, there are many projects located north of Farrer Park MRT station, across the road from the buzz and chaos of Little India - and less savoury activities at Desker Road.

    While many people also do not want to live near the Little India conservation area, some love living there, including artists and film-makers.

    The area is full of history and character. Race Course Road, for instance, took its name from Singapore's first race course, built in Farrer Park in 1842. One of the country's oldest Buddhist temples, Leong San Buddhist Temple, is also in the vicinity.

    And when some of the newer developments are completed, the residents might include a famous face or two. At least one local celebrity is believed to have bought a unit in a small development north of Farrer Park MRT station.

    For buyers, the good thing about these small projects is that they are mostly either freehold or 999-year leasehold. With the MRT station only a short walk away, residents are basically two MRT stops away from town.

    However, market watchers warn that buyers - those who bought off developer's plans - might not realise how small the units are until they see the completed apartments.

    Nowadays, the space allocated for bay windows, planter boxes, air-con ledges and balconies can eat significantly into your living area.

    'In some instances, they can make up as much as 20 per cent or more of the total. If you want more 'liveable' space, you should do a like-for-like comparision before you make your decision,' said Chesterton International's head of research and consultancy, Mr Colin Tan.

    For instance, at the 56-unit Citigate Residence on Rangoon Road, the 441 sq ft and 517 sq ft advertised for its smaller units include the bay window, air-con ledge, planter and balcony.

    Nevertheless, many buyers could still bite simply because of the seemingly low absolute prices and projected high rental yields, market watchers say.

    'Consumers must be more prudent. The absolute value of such developments might be low, but investors have to consider whether they can find a buyer or tenant later,' said HSR Property Group's executive director, Mr Eric Cheng. 'They are suitable only for those who are comfortable with small units.'

    He said that many buyers might not realise the units are too small to live in until the projects are completed.

    'One of my friends who bought a 580 sq ft unit on Mackenzie Road told me it's like a bird's nest,' he added.

    [email protected]

  8. #28
    CannotSpell Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dakoda sucks.
    For Dakoda new launch, 100% many units will be thrown back to developer mark my words... After they realised that they bought shit in the midst of low class hdb area with geylang the nearest entertainment spot.
    I thought it is Dakota Residences? Yes, Dakoda sucks (wherever that is) but Dakota does not.

  9. #29
    Unreg¡stered Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dakoda sucks.
    For Dakoda new launch, 100% many units will be thrown back to developer mark my words... After they realised that they bought shit in the midst of low class hdb area with geylang the nearest entertainment spot.
    ... but this is Pristine Heights leh ...

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    293

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by csg
    Hi all,
    Quote Originally Posted by csg

    Have you heard of a new development by Fragrance Properties Pte Ltd - Pristine Heights at 77 Mergui Road? Soft Launch now on. Seems to have splendid view of the city. Better grab fast, 60 units only...

    Just went to see today, 3 bed room, 1356 sq foot units have 270 degree unobstructed view of Orchard, Takashimaya, Tangs, Novena and Suntec City. Finishing also very good...

    Freehold also at about sgd 900-970 psf. TOP June' 2010.
    Partial Condo facitilies, with pool, gym, bbq, children pool and playground.

    Also realised some Indonesian Investors already bought whole of level 8. *Must be good investment opportunity? Looks like these foreign investors super fast seah!

    Oh yes, also very near to Farrer MRT (6-7 minutes walk!)

    By the way, its about 1-2 minutes away from Oxford Suites that recently sold off like pan cakes.

    I might want to get a unit there seah!

    Any thoughts?


    Below are not directed at anyone but strict my personal opinion. I extend my apologies if I inadvertably offended someone here.

    It is probably a bit late to make a comment here but I was down at the showflat and in my humble opinion , it is the worst showflat I ever been to.I was flabbergasted at the poor design, crap quality of material used, non-existence ID of the development. The marble used on the floor looks fake and even if they are marble, they are probably inferior marble. Rooms are extremely small, if you look at the picture of the bedroom in the previous post, you will see the headboard area facing the window. The reason for this werid design is because there is no other space to place the bed!!! I kid you not.Kitchen and toilets are so tiny and the finishes are quite bad.

    It was extremely disconcerting to find out that development sold 95% in three weeks (only left 4 units) at avg $1,000psf. Flip open the poorly done-up brochure and you will find ridiculous use of words in the brochure, words like ’slumber in vogue’ (huh???) on the page showing the bedroom and ‘delectable sustenance’ (double huh????) on the page showing the kitchen.

    It is really quite a waste of a good piece of land because the location is pretty good that is not too near to the expressway. Mergui sites will be too near, too noisy. Pity.

    My personal opinion. No offense.



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