Page 4 of 287 FirstFirst 123456781454104 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 20 of 1435

Thread: The Interlace (D3, 99 years Leasehold, CapitaLand)

  1. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Regulators
    this mess of building will surely make a statement, but does making a statement mean being iconic? Not in this case I think. Buildings like these may be fresh to look at for the first couple of years, but it becomes an eyesore after some time. Remember that this condo is designed by an ang mo and they usually dont care much about orientation. The orientation and fengshui of this condo is all over the place and i dont believe Capita and Hotel have looked very much into the fengshui aspect....
    Sometimes it is just common sense. Would you want to live where "containers" above looks like they are about to topple?

    Also those units in the middle of the highest "containers" has nothing underneath, just supported by both ends



  2. #17
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    8,130

    Default

    http://www.businesstimes.com.sg/sub/...49032,00.html?

    Published September 5, 2009

    CapLand to unveil 2 more home launches

    One is on the former Gillman Heights site; the other is in Cairnhill. By Uma Shankari


    SINGAPORE'S largest property developer CapitaLand is set to roll out two more residential launches this year - the 1,040-unit The Interlace on the site of the former Gillman Heights, and a 165-apartment luxury project in Cairnhill Road on the site of the former Char Yong Gardens.


    THE INTERLACE
    Design for the 1,040-unit condominium explores a new take on tropical living with an expansive and interconnected network of communal spaces


    The company yesterday unveiled the design for the The Interlace, which it is developing with Hotel Properties Ltd. The project will cost about $1.4 billion all up, including the $548 million - or $363 per sq ft of potential gross floor area - paid for Gillman Heights in 2007

    Prices could start from about $700,000 for a two-bedroom apartment, CapitaLand said. The project will be launched next month.

    The Interlace was designed by Ole Scheeren, a partner at the Office for Metropolitan Architecture - the firm behind the design of the distinct 54-storey China Central Television Station headquarters in Beijing. For The Interlace, Mr Scheeren wanted to break away from the standard kind of residential project in Singapore comprising a cluster of isolated, vertical towers.

    Instead, the design for The Interlace explores a new take on tropical living with an expansive and interconnected network of communal spaces. Thirty-one apartment blocks, each six stories tall, will be stacked in a hexagonal arrangement to form eight large-scale courtyards. The interlocking blocks will resemble a 'vertical village' with cascading sky gardens and private and public roof terraces.

    'This is a great opportunity to create and build a residential destination at the Gillman Heights site that will challenge the present architectural definition of the living space,' said Patricia Chia, chief executive of CapitaLand Residential Singapore.

    The Interlace will offer a variety of homes, from two and three-bedroom units to penthouses, when sales start in October. CapitaLand declined to say how the apartments will be priced in psf terms, but said that the construction cost for The Interlace will be around $250-$270 psf.

    It added that it will not be 'greedy' when it comes to the profit margin it is looking for and that homes will be 'affordable'. Analysts have previously estimated a breakeven cost of around $750 psf for the site, with an average selling price of $900 psf.

    The next launch for CapitaLand is the 165-unit freehold condominium at the former Char Yong Gardens, which will be rolled out before the end of this year. The project, designed by Kerry Hill Architects, will be a luxury development, said CapitaLand chief executive Liew Mun Leong.

    CapitaLand bought Char Yong Gardens for $1,788 psf of potential gross floor area, including development charges payable to the state, at the height of the property boom in 2007.

    More launches are planned for 2010, including one at Farrer Road on the former Farrer Court site. CapitaLand forked out a record $1.3 billion for that site in a collective sale in 2007.

    However, the en bloc market is unlikely to rebound to such levels again in the near future, Mr Liew said. The Laguna Park development on the East Coast is currently being offered for $1.2 billion, which would be the second-highest price ever for such a transaction.

    Mr Liew said: 'Given the cost of the land, given the construction cost and given the demand, it is too early for developers to confidently say the world economy has recovered and there will be buyers who can afford the price.'

    He also said that a 5 to 15 per cent increase in private home prices here would be 'reasonable' given pent-up demand and the low interest rates. '(But) if it jumps 30 per cent, then I will be a little bit concerned about whether it is sensible,' he added.

    Private home sales in Singapore jumped 52 per cent month-on-month in July to 2,767 units. A record 1,825 units were sold in June - but that number was easily surpassed just a month later. And prices are beginning to edge up. New projects released in recent weeks have been priced higher than in early 2009.

    shankari@sph.com.sg



  3. #18
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    8,130

    Default Togetherness and privacy Interlaced

    http://www.straitstimes.com/Prime%2B...ry_425593.html

    Sep 5, 2009 Saturday

    Togetherness and privacy Interlaced

    New condo at former Gillman Heights site architecturally unusual

    By Joyce Teo


    The $1.4 billion, 99-year leasehold The Interlace - seen in these impressions from the highway (left) and looking towards the sea - will be launched next month, at "affordable prices." The smallest units, at 75 sq m, could be about $700,000. - PHOTOS: CAPITALAND

    View more photos

    SOME are calling it an architectural marvel. Others lament that it looks like a stack of container boxes.

    Love it or hate it, the latest condominium project by CapitaLand and Hotel Properties on the former Gillman Heights site is expected to become a talking point.

    Designed by Mr Ole Scheeren from the world-renowned Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) Beijing, The Interlace boasts 1,040 apartments in 31 blocks.

    The blocks are stacked in a hexagonal arrangement to form eight large-scale courtyards on a sprawling 8ha site in Alexandra Road.

    Mr Scheeren, who has worked on the project design for two years, said at the launch of the design yesterday that it allows privacy and space, and 'yet defines a sense of togetherness'.

    The $1.4 billion, 99-year leasehold condominium will be launched next month.

    The pricing will be 'affordable', even if OMA cost 'two or three times more than a local architect', said CapitaLand chief executive Liew Mun Leong. 'We are not so greedy.'

    When asked, CapitaLand Residential Singapore chief executive Patricia Chia told reporters: 'We're trying very hard to keep it below $1,000 psf.'

    The smallest units, 75 sq m two-bedders, could be about $700,000, she said. The biggest are the 586 sq m super penthouses.

    Ms Chia said at yesterday's briefing that comparable developments include Reflections at Keppel Bay going for $1,500 to $1,700 psf and Caribbean at Keppel Bay at $800 to $1,400 psf.

    Looking ahead, Mr Liew, who is set to launch a luxury project by the end of the year and an upmarket one on the former Farrer Court site in the first half of next year, said a 5 per cent to 15 per cent rise in private home prices this year is reasonable. 'The tailwinds are coming back. This year will still be okay.'

    He said there is still a lot of latent demand from home hunters. He expects the strong property market to continue into the first half of next year.

    joyceteo@sph.com.sg



  4. #19
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    8,130

    Default

    http://www.straitstimes.com/Life%252...ry_425506.html

    Sep 5, 2009 Saturday

    Unusual suspect

    Architect Ole Scheeren's new condo project here has hexagonally stacked apartment blocks

    By tay suan chiang


    View more photos

    The architect behind the high-profile new project at the site of the former Gillman Heights estate has been to Singapore 'countless times'.

    With The Interlace and another project here, Mr Ole Scheeren is likely to make more visits.

    He says: 'Singapore almost seems to be an entire construction site. There is now more rebuilding than ever, and it is an impressive statement of its confidence and belief in its future.'

    The 38-year-old, a well-known Beijing-based German architect and partner at the Office of Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), is certainly contributing to Singapore's rebuilding in a big way.

    His design for The Interlace in Alexandra Road is set to change the way condominiums look in Singapore. It has 31 blocks of apartments stacked in a hexagonal arrangement.

    The joint project by CapitaLand and Hotel Properties is a move away from the more familiar condo look - isolated, vertical towers of apartments.

    This is the second project in Singapore for Mr Scheeren, who is dating Hong Kong actress Maggie Cheung. He also designed Far East Organization's Scotts Tower, a residential project at the junction of Scotts and Cairnhill roads.

    His overseas work includes Beijing's China Central Television Station (CCTV) and Bangkok's 300m MahaNakhon tower.

    Speaking at The Interlace's design presentation yesterday, he describes the project as a 'contemporary vertical village'.

    It will have 1,040 apartments spread across the blocks, each six storeys tall, interlocking with one another. There will also be public and private sky gardens, eight courtyards and a 1km jogging track on the 8ha site.

    He says setting the blocks in such a way gives residents views of the surrounding lush greenery.

    Another positive is privacy - the blocks are not close to one another and residents would be unable to look into their neighbours' homes, he adds.

    In addition, passers-by can spot the distinctive project from afar.

    This is not the first time he has produced buildings of unusual design: The CCTV headquarters consists of two towers that join at the top, while his most recent project, the MahaNakhon, has a pixelated facade.

    He tells Life! that OMA does not consciously make buildings look unusual. 'Our intention is not so much to make a building stand out by its shape but an interest in exploring new potentials and possibilities with architecture.'

    With The Interlace, he 'hopes to be able to show an alternative to the usual tower blocks in a condominium'.

    Local architects are in two minds about the project, though. Mr Tan Kok Hiang, founding director of Forum Architects, says he 'likes the architectural statement'.

    Mr John Ting, past president of the Singapore Institute of Architect, says: 'The architecture is a great breakthrough in a long time.'

    Architect Mink Tan of Mink Architects says, on first impression, The Interlace looks like 'stacks of Lego blocks' and 'does not evoke any village feel'. But he likes the attention to detail, such as on its facade.

    In 1995, Mr Scheeren joined OMA, which has offices in Rotterdam, Beijing and New York, and became a partner in 2002. He graduated from London's prestigious Architectural Association.

    The son of an architect, he wanted to be a rock musician, when his interest in architecture waned for a while.

    But his passion was renewed after he saw renowned architect Rem Koolhaas' winning work on a new centre for technology in Mr Scheeren's home town, Karlsruhe. He felt he could connect with Koolhaas' works and decided to work for him.

    He now oversees OMA's works in Asia, which include a media centre in Shanghai and the upcoming Taipei Performing Arts Centre.

    He has been living in Beijing for the last five years and began working in Asia 10 years ago.

    His first contact with the continent, however, was in 1992 when he spent 31/2 months backpacking in China, visiting places such as Shenzhen, Guangzhou and Kunming. The country then was not so opened up, but it showed him that 'the world was so different from what I had seen before'.

    Though he has been working in Asia for the past decade, particularly China, he has yet to master the Chinese language. But he is getting by, as 'more Asians speak English', and he and his local team have 'developed a system of communication that works'.

    taysc@sph.com.sg



  5. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Regulators
    this mess of building will surely make a statement, but does making a statement mean being iconic? Not in this case I think. Buildings like these may be fresh to look at for the first couple of years, but it becomes an eyesore after some time. Remember that this condo is designed by an ang mo and they usually dont care much about orientation. The orientation and fengshui of this condo is all over the place and i dont believe Capita and Hotel have looked very much into the fengshui aspect....
    i dont think so. this guy is based in Beijing and has done other designs like the China CCTV building. He is also dating Maggie Cheung.
    Definitely, he will have some knowledge on fengshui issues...



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •